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science by this is a show about science by scin histories. scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge combat and cutting edge technology that can help to technology that can help to detect a concussion before detect a concussion before it's it's too late. too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. operative. she was packaging that can one she was packaging that can one day replace day replace polysterene. polysterene. rachelle oldmixon specialises in rachelle oldmixon specialises in behaviours. behaviours. i'm i'm phil torres, i study insects phil torres, i study insects in peru. in peru. that's our team. that's our team. let's do some science. let's do some science. ♪ music ] ♪ music ] >> hi, guy, welcome back to >> hi, guy, welcome back to "techknow." "techknow." i'm phil torres, with rochelle, i'm phil torres, with rochelle, kyle and lindsay. kyle and lindsay. kyle, the nfl paid over kyle, the nfl paid over thre
never do that. you don't destroy the science to get to the headline. >> you don't distort the science to get to the headline. it you want to follow more of that issue, i recommend an amicus brief. i was involved in with it with the professor in which we recruited a number of distinguished scientists. we could have used more. and attempted so simply explain what the relevant issues on court junk dna were. but the court used it in the opinion nonetheless. it's an interesting brief, and easily obtained so the idea of the scientific safe guards then was those being used were not revealing much more than identity. it was sort of the basic end of the brief as well. privacy laden use of dna. statutes can be changed. supreme court clearly rejected the view in king by saying that once the statutes are in place, we will give a presumption they are followed. what is left after king? one issue is the balancing work the same in cases that are not, quote, seriouses offense. at least four times in the king opinion you see the phrase serious offense never defined. is it descriptive? if it's vital to
developments, in developments that include both science as well as the legal profession helping to decide which of these developments are great and how how can we best use them? one of the things i really enjoy about talking to groups of judges is that you have, this group has the collective wisdom to help figure out how we can use this information, use this information to its best possible purposes and of course to avoid any potential harmful outcomes so i would like to thank you for your attention this morning. i've a happy to address any questions. [applause] >> we have time for two or three questions. please come up to the microphones to the front and remember you will be immortalized on c-span. >> taking swabs and telling what your future medical problems are. how accurate are those predictions and is it worth the money? >> that is a great question. the question is about so-called direct consumer testing where you send a saliva sample into a company. they type your dna using what we call a dna chip and you get back a lot of information about your approximate ancestry and about your risk fo
science monitor. walden,esentative greg on to make haitians and technology. communications and technology. >> a several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning. treasury secretary jack lew will be at the future will trust to discuss the state of financial reform. also on c-span2, members of the house and energy commerce subcommittee on energy and power will hear from energy regulatory commissioners. span330 eastern a.m. on c- we cover a hearing on unemployment benefits that are set to expire at the end of the month. >> from age eight, betty ford, then betty [inaudible] put on skits and plays and that led to eddington, vermont where she studied at the school of dance. these are some of her notecards. no bookstworks -- where she kept cards. she carried this with her to vermont, back to grand rapids, off to new york where she studied with martha graham and work with the powers modeling agency and back to grand rapids again. you will find a host of things that you would find in just about any organizer. brochures on dance costumes, one of her sketches of a costume for one of the dance
on a victim's h hymen as signs of abuse. now, science says a normal hymen may appear scarred. >> this year, a new texas law went into effect that allows state courts to overturn convictions that were based on science that's later debunked. so, on november 18th, the san antonio four reunited as free women lemeeting cas an draw's granddaughter for the first time and ready to make up for lost time. >> there was, you know, deaths in our family, and there was births. marriages and, you know just so many things over the years that we have -- that we have missed. >> the road ahead won't be easy. the women have been released but not exonerated of the there is that led battle to fight, jobs to find and lives to rebuild. the four say as long as they stick together, they will do all of that and more. heidi joe castro, al jazeera, san antonio. >>> hearing from the man behind the largest ponzi scheme in u.s. history bernie madoff, a man responsiblefo from stealing 50. says prison is like summer camp. he spoke out about how he beliefs investors should have known better. he says people asked me all the t
at mcdonald's anymore or burger king. none of the food tastes right. they had a science project to tell me how many people have food -- ieating good still eat chitlins. was 13.d smoking when i what is this stuff going on for? it is not making people live longer. it is making people live longer. the lifespan span in the united states is going up. sure what genetic modification has to do with that. if you are eating genetically modified foods, if you are eating foods from the supermarket, just from the produce section, the chances are you are not eating anything that is genetically modified. there is a long list of foods that are not genetically modified. the only ones that i know about for short that are available are the genetically out of five papaya from hawaii -- the only ones that i know about for sure that are available are the genetically modified papaya from hawaii. if you bought them from stateside supermarkets, they llyl come from genetica modified varieties. i have been told there are some squash that come from genetically modified varieties. the percentages, i have been told, are no
the world, the u.s. failed to score in the top 20 of reading, math, and science. randi weingarten says that that is because the u.s. has a higher poverty rate than other developed countries. hour.s just over one >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn to turn mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law form -- law firm for several years. she taught in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as a ft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging retweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the broadcast is over to give repor
to be taken care of. this isn't science fiction anymore. now, undetectable firearms have always been around since the days of world war ii. it was clearly a present danger. that's why in 19 both parties got together to pass it and it's been extended since then. but it is no longer science fiction that somebody can just make a gun in their basement, basically obliterating the utility of all of our nation's firearms laws and use it to perpetrate great evil throughout this cannes. -- throughout it country. 3-d printers cost only about $2,000 today. most futurists are pretty certain that in maybe a decade or more, most americans will have access to this technology, just like the photocopier and the personal computer seemed out of reach at some point for most middle-class americans. maybe today the 3-d printer is but in a decade or more it might just be another household appliance that sits right next to your computer printer. second, we know how dangerous plastic guns are, because people have tested this premise. one investigative journalist in israel took a plastic gun into the israeli parliam
walden told the christian science monitor that we are looking at real reform that is done a piece at a time, step by step. my guess is that it comes later next year. in your opinion is a piecemeal approach the best way to go? should that be the only way that the house can go? >> it appears to be. look, let's, first of all, get one thing clear. democrats were in charge 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 in the house of representatives. we never took the issue up. unfortunately now for our side, republicans are in charge and guess what, they're going to say how it is it's going to come about. here's the good thing. the good thing is they say they're going to do it. so if comprehensive immigration reform, thomas, you and i take any bill on comprehensive immigration. part is border security, the dream act, ag workers, future flows for the high tech industry and a pathway to legalization. so immigration reform is clearly -- you can clearly divide it up because there are different components that make up the package. look, as long as in the end none of the parts causes me any acid indigestion or il
devotion to yanukovich was the prime minister and wanting to use science to the president said the new coach at the stein i did took on too so that's why if they were peacefully protesting at the stein is only a track record at two zero there was a dog auctions of people who achilles about yanukovich his decision to side will withdraw sure it's good to see ukraine come more into the russian sphere of influence what where are those people i mean it's like fifty percent are fought by its said that we don't know you did that but we might know is that at the local launch and ties with russia are not anti european and deploy your rookie year and i'm not a station the auntie rach. the question is that they advanced towards russia and russia. these last months used french so there is a kind of dependency the ukrainian people and get it on to lose and even duma what you think. yanukovich can too. i mean the pa from results of thought into heavy handed tactics. what else could he do to to try and spot so often million people use or if it's a brave the snow in and take to the streets i think i t
are lagging behind their international counterparts in math, reading, science. the new international standardized test scores indicate 15-year-olds in the u.s. were below the international average in math, about average in science and reading and dropped down in the ranking since the last test three years ago. the top scores from each subject came from shanghai. >>> take a look at this incredible rescue that took place 20 miles off the nigerian coast around under water. three days after a tugboat capsized, divers were looking for bodies and a hand reached up to get them. the boat's cook was alive. he survived in a four-foot air bubble. he only had coca-cola to drink. he spent so long under water with so little oxygen he had to spend another 60 hours in a decompression chamber once he returned to the surface. unbelievable. >>> fascinating photo has the internet buzzing about whether a face can be seen in a steel column from the world trade center. do you see it? workers say they have been talking about a face for a while. some even call it the angel of 9/11 but it's getting a lot of a
, the legislation does not go far enough. >> a few years ago these undetectible plastic guns were science fiction. they were the stuff of movies. now they're frighteningly real. it will be unimaginable for congress not to pass a strong law that closes the loopholes and bans these guns once and for all. >> the nra did not oppose the extension of the plastic gun ban but does oppose any expansion of it. >>> now to business. later this morning the adp's employment report will be out. in terms of stocks yesterday, all three major indices in negative territory. almost 100 points in the dow which is back below 16,000. it's the longest losing streak in two months. joining us now this is a treat, kayla. >> you have to say that. >> it is a treat when anyone from state side comes on our show. >> thank you, brian. well, our eyes turn again to washington because regulators are set to vote on a key portion of the dod-frank regulation next tuesday, december 10th. it's expected to be approved. the passing of the rule will mark an era of stricter oversight for wall street with a lot of restrictions on how banks c
. this chart shows, the level rise since the 1900s and the science is very clear, the sea level rise will occur, over the next 50 and 100 years, and a study found that for portland, sea level, it is expected to rise, between ten to 17 inches, by 2050 and between 31 to 69 inches by 2100. executed. and this proposed study represents the staff and a larger effort to address the sea level rise and bewe know that it will impact our property and far less is known about adaptation strategies. and the map here, is the sea wall from china basin north as you see as part of the embarcadero national district and the sea wall south appear 54 was constructed after the 1950s, and my poor attempt to show you where mission creek is located. and mission creek provides a really ideal location to study adaptation strategies because it is one of the lowest lying areas. and storm water run off from mission bay, also trains to mission creek and complicating future flooding events and this is an ideal place to study and this graphic shows the existing condition in green, and in red, the 2050 scenario, and with 15 inch
of the way the transition system operates in the science cost and i'm concerned that under order 1,000, ferc is defining the benefits so broadly into spreading the cost so wisely that the simple action has no meaning anymore. chairwoman lafleur, please explain the idea of the beneficiary pay and what that should mean and keep in mind i don't want my constituents. i know you can't address the merits of the individual complaints filings under the 1,000 but there is a leave of the point i would like to raise with you that i think stands on its own which i hope you will be able to respond. >> thank you congressman. the order 1,000 required to plan cooperatively across the region as the region encompassing pennsylvania already does. and take into account three kinds of benefits. reliability benefits, which can be hard to quantify that are very real, the needing public policy requirements to connect to resources that the states require them to connect which are normally identified by the states such as pennsylvania which is a renewable portfolio standard, and a third congestion benefits to reduce
. hosted by the christian science monitor. this is just over one hour. >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn since her mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law firm for several years. she taught history in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the breakfast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreatening signal and i will call on one and all. low on the subtleties scale, but nonthreatening anyway. the n
for computer skype tists and a leap for explorers and researchers. >>. >> i know it's meant for science, but it looks like it will be great to watch tv on. >> michael eaves will run down the big game. >> hundreds gather to mark a 33rd anniversary of nelson mandela's death. more when we return. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. an act of terror then a rush to justice for pan am flight 103. >> the eyes of the world will be on us. >> an investigation under scrutiny. >> it looks nothing like him. somebody's telling lies. >> this was a miscarriage of justice. >> did they get the wrong man? >> there's something else going on. >> a shocking documentary event begins with: the pan am bomber on al jazeera america presents. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with a quick look at the top stories. >> people across south africa and the world are honouring the legacy of nelson mandela. religious services are hold across the globe to remember one of the greatest leaders of our time. increasing tensions in asia
as a manageable medical condition. the science gives us great reason for optimism and hope. there are currently more than already safe and effective antiretrovirals drugs and combinations. researchers continue to develop new treatments. what is more, we're making progress to new medications and regimens that are longer lasting and simpler to use. far fewer side effects. those regimens reduce the amount of hiv in the body. that helps people living with hiv to stay healthy and live longer. we also know from the nih funding research, hiv transmission is drastically reduced when the amount of hiv virus in an affected person is reduced to undetectable levels. meanwhile, our partner agency, the fda, has approved new, rapid diagnostic test which can be used in a variety of settings to identify hiv in an infected individual. it might not be tested in a traditional health care setting. as we speak, nih grantees and scientists are exploring ways to treat hiv infections by administering anti-hiv antibodies. they have begun early-stage testing of an antibody that was effective in protecting human cells aga
attention to a new report from the nation's premiere scientific body, the national academy of sciences. we typically associate climate change with gradual, longer term problems. according to the academy, climate change could also pose a risk of rapid hard to predict environmental changes that have the potential to cause widespread damage in the near term. the report warns that the collapse of the polar sea ice could send sea levels soaring. the destruction of the coral reefs could cause mass extinction of sea life, the elimination of summer sea ice in the arctic could alter the world's weather patterns. these tipping points could happen suddenly. it's reckless to do nothing in face of these threats. if there is a 10% chance that these threats would happen, it's irresponsible for us to ignore it. dr. richard alley, one of the authors said, you can't see it coming. you can't prepare for it. congress is irresponsible if we don't take this issue seriously. to pass on our planet worthy of our children and grandchildren's future. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. . the n
, he was obsessed with science, astrong me, physics, he fell in with the wrong crowd, became a father too soon and lost his job and home. >> this guy patrick walks up. >> reporter: yeah. >> and says can i talk to you? >> yeah. >> reporter: what goes through your head? >> wow. >> reporter: what did you think he wanted? >> i didn't believe anything. you got the wrong guy. no, he just said hey, i have something strange but i'm pushing an offer and instantly i just said, in my mind, door number two. >> reporter: and then, the stranger actually showed up with an actual laptop, and those lessons turned into an obsession. he would write code for hours, for days on the banks of the hudson or in a nook in pratt trick's office. at night, patrick would go home and leo would go outside. shelters aren't his thing, which seem fine until winter blew in. how do you stay warm on the really bitter nights? >> you go to the train station. >> reporter: yeah. like tons of blankets. >> it's getting really cold and i keep telling him this. he's like i'm good, man, let's keep going. >> reporter: patrick wante
recognizes the gentleman from alabama, mr. brooks, for five minutes. mr. speaker, the science space and technology committee recently held a hearing on healthcare.gov cybersecurity threats. our bipartisan expert witness panel included dr. frederick check, a computer science professor at s.m.u., dr. ruben, a computer science professor at johns hopkins university, david kennedy, former chief security officer of dibold incorporated and currently the principal security consultant for trusted sec, and morgan write, formerly with cisco security and now c.e.o. of crowd sourced investigations. now i'm not a cybersecurity expert, but i can read the words of those who are. the s.s.t. committee's hearing charter informs members that in order to fully use healthcare.gov, american citizens must input or verify highly personal information such as date of birth and social security numbers for all family members, household salary, debt information, credit card information, place of employment, home addresses, and the like. information that is a treasure-trove for cybercriminals and identity thieves
previously thought. read about that on our science page. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, fast-food workers plan strikes in 100 cities across the country to protest low-wages. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. for all of us here at the "pbs newshour," thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> this is bbc world news america. funding of this
, a not-for-profit think tank in the washington dc area that focuses on the issues of science and technology and how science and technology is changing our society for almost 17 years now we have been the host at home for the international terrorism studies have it up by professor yonah alexander and i think most people here would agree and understand that the center that yonah heads up is one of the most for most academic institutions and consortium of institutions in the world focusing on all aspects of terrorism. professor alexander blank group has looked up, studied and published documents on every conceivable realm and aspect of terrorism for many, many years and is personally and author of over 100 books on the subject and we are quite proud here at the potomac institute could be the home of his academic efforts. we are also privileged to partner with the international law institute and representing them as he always has and is the chairman of the international institute and for well over a decade we have partnered with professor wallace to bring to you these seminars an
you offer is this. >> you can learn things focussing on technology and computer science, being computer literate and so on to go and learn about big data or about how to do stuff on the web. you learn this online. go there, sign up and take a class. some of our classes are free. we also offer services such as mentoring, coaching and examination. you work with google and facebook to put their materials online. we get from them the most up to date, cutting edge stuff you need to know to be successful in the career of tech. you can learn this stuff. facebook teaches internally to it's engineers. so if you as a person want to be proficient in big data, go and sign up. >> does this replace a college degree or someone in the work place can use to add on a constant life learning, learning, learning? >> we think of it like a letter like continued learning, life long learning, staying up to date. our data suggests that too. very few come to us straight out of college or in college. most come to us, young professionals that want to understand the latest and best in technology. things tur
years ago, but he works in his time, not ours. we're free. >> the so-called junk science that put the kellers in prison for 21 years is the target of a test of law allowing convictions to be challenged. the law has been in effect for three months in a state where wrongful convictions are the most numerous in the country. >> in san antonio three women won their freedom in late november. these women were imprisoned for 16 years. the four women were convicted of satanic ritual abuse of two children, one who later recanted her story. just as in mc-keller's case a medical expert admitted to erownous forensic testing. >> i felt like everything we claimed did not happen. and for her to basically say that, you know, there was no - that there is no evidence or it was faulty i kind of felt like - how come nobody listened. >> while the women and mc-keller have been freed, they have not been exonerated. for that another legal battle laws's limits. >> that was heidi jo-castro in austin texas. >> and it will be a difficult road ahead for the u.s. men's soccer team and jith john henry smith is h
by bigger and bigger storms would need to focus on the science of communities. i would also propose we strengthen the emergency response capacity of the local mission. i know ms. steele has been strong the development aspect of supportive of the construction efforts that have gone there. i don't think they have the team and staff to respond to a three to five-year effort that's going to be there and i would say we look at mechanisms to assist her in her step in responding over the longer-term in assisting filipinas and developing. i will say it has been mentioned before, the filipino community has been quick to respond. it varies billion, very proud people and caring people and the government now is winding up in moving forward. recent leadership from the u.s., which i think they would welcome, they would be positioned well for the future. thank you. >> thank you so very much for the tremendous job catholic relief services is doing. we were fully briefed by joe curry while we were there and tom o'reilly took his bitterly around. we got to see the operation upfront and was extremely imp
and they're being used to do science surveys. >> these are not places that have skyscrapers and a lot of -- in theory, there's not a lot of other aerospace clutter, if you will. that's a big deal. it would never work in manhattan, for example. >> well, i guess i would never say never. the truth is technologically speaking they could fly one of these things from downtown to midtown to your offices here today. >> look at cars. they can tell you when to stop, how fast, when to move. >> that's true, never say never. >> the technology greatly exceeds their ability. >> how about flying in inclimate weather? could the flying ha batibachi, wasn wanted to take off -- >> i raise you one. thieves. there's a $40,000 drone. i'll shoot it out of the sky. >> they're doing research right now to use drones to carry explosives for avalanche control in the mountains. >> that would be fascinating. >> when it's so foggy or the weather is so bad you can't send people out for avalanches for highways, for instance -- >> genius. >> you could program it to travel up at noon and drop an explosive for avalanche
in agricultural sciences and earning his masters in business from delaware valley college, eric went to work for the pennsylvania department of agriculture. there he administered the rural youth grant program, led the county fair and agri tourism division and director for the central office in that department. he holds several leadership roles in the marcellus shale coalition, bringing together the two most important industries, energy and agriculture. eric is well deserving of this honor and we thank him for his leadership in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on
in the united states, saying it is the transportation and science committee -- as we move forward towards integrating drones into civilian life and capitalizing on the economic opportunities they offer, we must make certain that these aircraft's meet rigorous safety and privacy standards. the commerce committee said the hearing was already in the works before the amazon announcement on sunday. her knees from hartsdale, new -- bernice from hartsdale, new york on our support line. favor of using the drones because i just enrolled in a prescription d plan on medicare. i will get the best price if i use mail order to obtain my drugs. i take 14 prescription drugs. it is very difficult to keep things in order. in order to get the prescription i haveelivered on time, to call two weeks ahead of time. it seems insurmountable. however, if i saw that i was running out of drugs and they could be delivered in a half hour, it would be most helpful. i think for old ladies on prescription d, it might be a help. host: that is bernice from new york. this,ve probably heard but -- dylan from alabama, you are
classroom, according to test results focussing on maths, english and science. singapore, taiwan and south korea are at the top of the list. the american results were called a picture of stagnation. the test was given to 50-year-olds in 55 countries. a man was trapped for three days under water after his boat capsized off the coast of name earia. it was an accident that took the lives of many people. >> this was the mission to recover bodies from a boat. suddenly a rescue diver finds this. >> harrison survived for three days in a pocket of air, drinking water and fizzy drinks. is 11 of the crew died when it capsized and sank. >> a diver pulls harrison from the sunken boat. >> harrison is now safe and with a story of remarkable survival to tell. . >> it's amazing. he survived off one bottle of soda. >> anunderwater discovery of a different sore. this 400 foot mega-subways found off the sea floor of hawaii. it dates back to world war ii. it was one of five that met a similar fate. >>> in australia a birt took a camera on the flight of its life. he took off on a 70 mile journey. the bird's fl
planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. if every u.s. home replaced one light bulb with a compact fluorescent bulb, the energy saved could light how many homes? 1 million? 2 million? 3 million? the answer is... 3 million homes. by 2030, investments in energy efficiency could help americans save $300 billion each year. take the energy quiz. energy lives here. >>> up next, the surprising admission to the engineer at the controls of sunday's deadly train crash up next on "morning joe." this is the quicksilver cash back card from capital one. it's not the "fumbling around with rotating categories" card. it's not the "getting blindsided by limits" card. it's the no-game-playing, no-earning-limit-having, deep-bomb-throwing, give-me-the-ball-and-i'll-take- it-to-the-house, cash back card. this is the quicksilver cash card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere, every single day. so let me ask you... what's in your wallet? medicare open enrollment. of year again. s
any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. because what you don't know, can hurt you.urance. what if you didn't know that posting your travel plans online may attract burglars? [woman] off to hawaii! what if you didn't know that as the price of gold rises, so should the coverage on your jewelry? [prospector] ahh! what if you didn't know that kitty litter can help you out of a slippery situation? the more you know, the better you can plan for what's ahead. talk to farmers and get smarter about your insurance. ♪ we are farmers bum - pa - dum, bum - bum - bum - bum♪ >>> nelson mandela spent, what, 27 years in prison. much of that time was spent in the notoriously brutal conditions on robben island off the coast of south africa. few can recount the horror that nelson mandela had to endure. one man certainly can. this man was imprisoned on robben island while mandela was there. and he's joining us. thank you for coming in. tell our viewers what daily life was like for prisoners on robben island. >> so much so, that it was easy to forget the
point. it's protruding new coal-fired generation in this country spent the science that tells us we've got to reduce carbon pollution and the economics are telling us the exact same thing. and about the state of florida where now taxpayers will have to invest and are already investing huge sums of money to begin to adapt to a changing climate. think about the huge bills, the bills that come to every time have an extreme weather event, whether it's drought or super storms. and i would think that the utility industry also sees the writing on the wall, they're looking for the certainty and the more aggressive we are moving away from carbon intensive energy generation, the better. thank you very much. ..e gentleman from west virginia mr. mckinley for five minutes. >> chairman lafleur, perhaps you can give me some direction on this. we have a growing problem in west virginia with the various constituents. currently a lot of it has to be shipped. a lot of it is being wasted which is a shame. that doesn't benefit the consumer and doesn't help the environment any. my question is what i am h
. >> the science and the economics as well tells us we've got to reduce carbon pollution and the economics are telling us the exact same thing you think about the state of florida where now the tax payers have to invest in are already investing huge sums of money to begin to adapt to a changing climate. think about the huge bill, the bills that come due every time we have an extreme weather events whether it is a drought or super storm. i would think that utility industry also sees the writing on the wall if they are looking for that certainty and the more aggressive we are on moving away from the carbon intensive energy generation, the better. >> the gentle ease time is expired. this time recognize the gentleman from west virginia mr. mckinley for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. chairman lafleur perhaps you can give me some direction on this. we have a growing problem in west virginia with the production of the various constituents with ngl that we can't use this as only the local market. it has to be shipped. currently a lot of it is just wasted which is a shame and doesn't ben
and not tap water was more science fiction. this week on tuesday, the house voted to extend that law. sorry. got a little teleprompter screw up here. i'm reading the same thing over and over again. but the -- it is on to the senate now, and what is -- what makes it so complicated in the senate is the fact that senators are basically -- some senators, particularly democratic senators, who are saying that the law doesn't go far enough as it is currently written. so the question now, the dilemma now, that the senate faces is do you pass this law, do you renew this law that was created in 1988, take the attention you can get on that for another ten years, or do you wage a fight, push a fight here, saying we want this law to go farther, we want new provisions in there that would make it impossible for guns that would be printed on the new 3d printers that are coming out, that would make it impossible for those guns to pass through airport security. so that is the dilemma that they are -- that they are facing. now to give you a little history and context for this, you have to go back to the last
know this looks like science fiction. it's not. >> wow. >> this is early. this is still years away. drops the package. >> there's the package. >> come and get your package. we can do half-hour delivery. >> half-hour delivery? >> half-hour delivery and carry objects we think up to five pounds. >> that service amazon prime air could be ready for use in four or five years and could carry objects to discuss merles within a ten-mile radius of a distribution center. when's the worst that could happen? tweet us. we'll get your responses later on in the morning. people had ideas already about worse worst-case scenarios. >> try landing in the streets in manhattan. >> yes. >> the other thing is have you noticed how innocent they look? cute little drones. as time goes on, you can see it's the future. presumably they're armed or they'll -- >> hellfires on there. >> did you see quot blif i don't know" with tom cruise? >> no. it was a part of "homeland." >> i won't give away more. >> thank you very much. they keep innovating and, carl, we have seen apparently they're not the first to think about
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